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20121101
20121101
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
island woke up without power. joining me now live on the phone is new york congressman steve israel whose district encompasses a large portion of island. what can you give us on the progress this morning? >> we've gone from a wind emergency and a flood emergency to a power emergency. as you just said, there are nearly 3/4 of 1 million long islanders who do not have power. long island power authority is making a slow and incremental progress. what concerns me at this point is last night for the first time since the storm, the temperatures dipped down into the 30s. so long islanders are experiencing very cold temperatures. if it continues, this becomes beyond a power emergency. it becomes a public health and safety emergency. one thing that the administration has done, which i'm grateful for, is they've deployed national forest service assets, chainsaws, woodchipers, and personnel, about 120 national forest service personnel to long island to help with tree removal and downed trees. >> it is pretty amazing when we think about this being november 1st. here we are talking about being in the t
misspoke and said there were no more hospitals in manhattan open. i forgot about beth israel. which is down at the lower eve east side. so there is one. la guardia will open tomorrow. that's the good news. as for the limited subway service that resumes tomorrow in new york, there in new york, no trains will be running south of 34th street, an area that includes, of course, the financial district. sandy's crippled the nation's biggest transit system. some stations remain under water right now. there's catastrophic damage to underground tracks and equipment. the mta says it is too early to tell when full service will return or if every subway line can be fixed. some of them may be beyond repair. millions of riders depend on the subway each day, all of us in the city. a few commuter train lines went into service this afternoon. for the most part, commuters relied on buses, on cars, on cabs if they could get them and gouged for prices on the cabs. there is gridlock as bad as we have ever seen in manhattan. look at this. this is columbus circle south of central park on the west side earlier toda
said there were no more hospitals in lower manhattan open. but i forgot about beth israel. so there is one. laguardia airport. late word tonight it will reopen tomorrow, that is the good news. as for limited subway service that resumes tomorrow in new york, no rains running south of 34th street in an area that includes the financial district. sandy has crippled the nation's biggest transit system. some stations remain underwater. catastrophic damage to underground tracks and equipment. the mta says it's too early to tell when full service will return or if every subway line can actually be fixed. some may be beyond repair. millions depend on the subway each day. all of us in the city a few commuter train lines went back into service this afternoon. for the most part, commuters relied on buses, cars, and cabs and weren't being gouged on prices. gridlock as bad as we've been seen in manhattan. take a look at columbus circle, south of central park on the west side earlier today. one massive traffic jam, largely caused by that train, still dangling over 57th street and closed off
manhattan, and that's beth israel. mayor michael bloomberg talked about what happened. >> they didn't think the damage was that bad and we did have a generator going and the national guard helped carry fuel up to the roof, because that's where the fuel tank was and they were running out. but the bottom line is when they got into the basement, they realized there was more damage. >> a lot of questions about this right now. joining us now to talk about this is dr. erwin redlenner, he has studied how hospitals handled katrina. he knows everything, really, about disaster preparedness. and doctor, i have to ask you this. we've seen a lot of businesses, big businesses like goldman sachs, big buildings downtown on generator power. they're up and running. why not a hospital? >> well, it's not clear why not a hospital. and one of the problems here is initially, years ago, we had generators in the basements of hospitals, which is obviously something that doesn't really work, because when they get flooded, the generators go out. so they moved the generators up to higher elevations, but leave the fuel
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)

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